A Survivor's Guide to Patent Scrutiny

October 14, 2010

A panel of in-house counsel and Hamilton Brook Smith Reynolds attorneys, Susan Glovsky and Vivien Tannoch-Magin, will introduce the audience to an acquisition gone wrong.

They will address the questions: Will the patent portfolio survive due diligence? When the deal goes south, what power does each corporation have in licensing negotiations? Did the companies protect themselves when litigation looms?

Gain new insight on significant corporate events and help the panel make some tough decisions as the corporations' relationship unfolds:

  • Deal Maker or Deal Breaker
    • Strength of international patent and trade secret protection for inventions
    • Global decisions to assure value in obtaining enforceable protection of a broad spectrum of inventions – product to software to medical use
    • Protection and ownership of technology developed by a company’s workforce
    • Agreements with third parties to protect confidentiality
    • Value of the brand acquired
    • Limiting acquisition of someone else’s problems
  • Licensing Power
    • All licenses are not created equal
    • IP value can be country dependent -- what is protectable in the U.S. may be of little value in China, India, or Argentina
  • Litigating to Win
    • Enforceable protection that covers commercial products
    • The global landscape
    • Negotiation activity that impacts litigation
About

October 14, 2010

A panel of in-house counsel and Hamilton Brook Smith Reynolds attorneys, Susan Glovsky and Vivien Tannoch-Magin, will introduce the audience to an acquisition gone wrong.

They will address the questions: Will the patent portfolio survive due diligence? When the deal goes south, what power does each corporation have in licensing negotiations? Did the companies protect themselves when litigation looms?

Gain new insight on significant corporate events and help the panel make some tough decisions as the corporations' relationship unfolds:

  • Deal Maker or Deal Breaker
    • Strength of international patent and trade secret protection for inventions
    • Global decisions to assure value in obtaining enforceable protection of a broad spectrum of inventions – product to software to medical use
    • Protection and ownership of technology developed by a company’s workforce
    • Agreements with third parties to protect confidentiality
    • Value of the brand acquired
    • Limiting acquisition of someone else’s problems
  • Licensing Power
    • All licenses are not created equal
    • IP value can be country dependent -- what is protectable in the U.S. may be of little value in China, India, or Argentina
  • Litigating to Win
    • Enforceable protection that covers commercial products
    • The global landscape
    • Negotiation activity that impacts litigation

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