The Innovation Firm

For More Information, Contact:

Coreen Feeley
coreen.feeley@hbsr.com

Innovation in Life Sciences: Demystifying Patent Eligibility

June 14, 2017

The U.S. Supreme Court has issued several opinions in the last few years curtailing or eliminating patent eligibility in several well-established areas of biotechnology, including genetics, diagnostics and methods of detection.  The U.S. Patent Office looks to these decisions and to those of lower courts for guidance when examining patent applications.  Life science companies should take note: building a strong intellectual property portfolio will often hinge on a greater understanding of how discoveries fit into the framework recently established by the Patent Office under judicial precedent. 

This was an interactive panel discussion with Hamilton Brook Smith Reynolds intellectual property attorneys N. Scott Pierce and Mary K. Murray, Ph.D., and guest panelist James P. McNamara, Ph.D., Executive Director, Office of Technology Management, UMass Medical School.

The panel discussed:

  • the criteria applied by the U.S. Patent Office and courts when assessing whether a discovery is patent-eligible
  • case studies of discoveries in life sciences that are patentable
  • what to consider when assessing discoveries in life sciences in view of recent Supreme Court and lower court decisions and ensuing examination guidelines prepared by the U.S. Patent Office
About

June 14, 2017

The U.S. Supreme Court has issued several opinions in the last few years curtailing or eliminating patent eligibility in several well-established areas of biotechnology, including genetics, diagnostics and methods of detection.  The U.S. Patent Office looks to these decisions and to those of lower courts for guidance when examining patent applications.  Life science companies should take note: building a strong intellectual property portfolio will often hinge on a greater understanding of how discoveries fit into the framework recently established by the Patent Office under judicial precedent. 

This was an interactive panel discussion with Hamilton Brook Smith Reynolds intellectual property attorneys N. Scott Pierce and Mary K. Murray, Ph.D., and guest panelist James P. McNamara, Ph.D., Executive Director, Office of Technology Management, UMass Medical School.

The panel discussed:

  • the criteria applied by the U.S. Patent Office and courts when assessing whether a discovery is patent-eligible
  • case studies of discoveries in life sciences that are patentable
  • what to consider when assessing discoveries in life sciences in view of recent Supreme Court and lower court decisions and ensuing examination guidelines prepared by the U.S. Patent Office

Back to the Top