Should Innovation Be Free? (An Innovation Series Debate)

April 8, 2015

Hamilton Brook Smith Reynolds is pleased to be a sponsor of the MIT Enterprise Forum of Cambridge. The forum's Innovation Series event, "Should Innovation Be Free?," was held on Wednesday, April 8, 2015, from 5:30 - 8:00 p.m. at the MIT Stata Center in Cambridge.

Among the attorneys from our firm in attendance was Brian Moriarty (a panelist).

 

MIT Enterprise Forum Event Description

MIT Stata CenterIt’s a debate that has gone on for as long as innovation itself. One side argues that innovation works best — and society is best served — if new ideas are allowed to flourish based solely on their merit, not someone’s ability to pay. The other side argues that paying innovators is only fair, that not paying them stems the flow of new products and services society sorely needs, and that the marketplace is the true measure of a new idea’s value.

At this Innovation Series event you’ll hear both sides — free software advocates, open innovation thought leaders, intellectual property attorneys, entrepreneurs, and investors. It’s a moderated debate where two opposing teams will each state their case, take questions from the other side and the audience, and give rebuttals. It may not deliver the final answer to this question — but this event will definitely put on full display a clash of viewpoints you don’t often get to see.

 

For more information, please visit the MIT Enterprise Forum of Cambridge website.

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April 8, 2015

Hamilton Brook Smith Reynolds is pleased to be a sponsor of the MIT Enterprise Forum of Cambridge. The forum's Innovation Series event, "Should Innovation Be Free?," was held on Wednesday, April 8, 2015, from 5:30 - 8:00 p.m. at the MIT Stata Center in Cambridge.

Among the attorneys from our firm in attendance was Brian Moriarty (a panelist).

 

MIT Enterprise Forum Event Description

MIT Stata CenterIt’s a debate that has gone on for as long as innovation itself. One side argues that innovation works best — and society is best served — if new ideas are allowed to flourish based solely on their merit, not someone’s ability to pay. The other side argues that paying innovators is only fair, that not paying them stems the flow of new products and services society sorely needs, and that the marketplace is the true measure of a new idea’s value.

At this Innovation Series event you’ll hear both sides — free software advocates, open innovation thought leaders, intellectual property attorneys, entrepreneurs, and investors. It’s a moderated debate where two opposing teams will each state their case, take questions from the other side and the audience, and give rebuttals. It may not deliver the final answer to this question — but this event will definitely put on full display a clash of viewpoints you don’t often get to see.

 

For more information, please visit the MIT Enterprise Forum of Cambridge website.

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