The Innovation Firm

When

April 7, 2015
12:00 - 1:00 p.m.

Where

Boston Bar Association
16 Beacon Street
Boston, MA

More Info

Elizabeth Vincensi
evincensi@bostonbar.org

Double Patenting Under the AIA

On Tuesday, April 7, 2015, Scott Pierce, Principal, and the Boston Bar Association's Life Sciences Committee presented "Double Patenting Under the AIA." Scott spoke from 12:00 - 1:00 p.m. at the Boston Bar Association's offices located at 16 Beacon Street, Boston, MA.

 

Boston Bar Association Event Description:

Boston Bar AssociationThis program will cover the judicially-created doctrine of obviousness-type double patenting. The discussion will include issues associated with basing obviousness-type double patenting on the first patent to expire, rather than solely on the basis of the first patent to issue.

 

For more information, please visit the Boston Bar Association website.

 

Scott PierceScott Pierce practices in the areas of biotechnology, chemistry, chemical engineering, electronics, medical devices, and pharmaceuticals. Recent work has included semiconductors, heterojunction bipolar transistors, lithium ion batteries, abdominal and thoracic stent grafts, biomechatronics, renewable energy, water denitrification, antioxidants, wearable computers, nanotechnology, and living cationic polymerization.

In addition to preparing and prosecuting U.S. and foreign patent applications, Scott files and prosecutes trademark applications, conducts due diligence analyses and prepares legal opinions directed to patent infringement, inventorship and validity issues. He reviews license agreements, supports litigation, and sits on client patent committees. He has been practicing intellectual property law for over 25 years and is a member of the firm’s Management Committee.

Scott regularly lectures on topical issues of intellectual property law and has authored several academic articles on intellectual property addressing such topics as written description, utility, inherency, experimental use, obviousness, statutory eligibility and the America Invents Act. He is an Adjunct Professor at Suffolk University Law School teaching biotechnology patent law and was a Senior Editor of the Buffalo Law Review.

Overview

When

April 7, 2015
12:00 - 1:00 p.m.

Where

Boston Bar Association
16 Beacon Street
Boston, MA

On Tuesday, April 7, 2015, Scott Pierce, Principal, and the Boston Bar Association's Life Sciences Committee presented "Double Patenting Under the AIA." Scott spoke from 12:00 - 1:00 p.m. at the Boston Bar Association's offices located at 16 Beacon Street, Boston, MA.

 

Boston Bar Association Event Description:

Boston Bar AssociationThis program will cover the judicially-created doctrine of obviousness-type double patenting. The discussion will include issues associated with basing obviousness-type double patenting on the first patent to expire, rather than solely on the basis of the first patent to issue.

 

For more information, please visit the Boston Bar Association website.

 

Presenter Bios

Scott PierceScott Pierce practices in the areas of biotechnology, chemistry, chemical engineering, electronics, medical devices, and pharmaceuticals. Recent work has included semiconductors, heterojunction bipolar transistors, lithium ion batteries, abdominal and thoracic stent grafts, biomechatronics, renewable energy, water denitrification, antioxidants, wearable computers, nanotechnology, and living cationic polymerization.

In addition to preparing and prosecuting U.S. and foreign patent applications, Scott files and prosecutes trademark applications, conducts due diligence analyses and prepares legal opinions directed to patent infringement, inventorship and validity issues. He reviews license agreements, supports litigation, and sits on client patent committees. He has been practicing intellectual property law for over 25 years and is a member of the firm’s Management Committee.

Scott regularly lectures on topical issues of intellectual property law and has authored several academic articles on intellectual property addressing such topics as written description, utility, inherency, experimental use, obviousness, statutory eligibility and the America Invents Act. He is an Adjunct Professor at Suffolk University Law School teaching biotechnology patent law and was a Senior Editor of the Buffalo Law Review.

More Info

Elizabeth Vincensi
evincensi@bostonbar.org

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