Lessons From The 1st Inter Partes Review Ruling

December 5, 2013

By: Susan G. L. Glovsky and Timothy J. Meagher

Law360

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The following is an excerpt from this article on Law360.

In Garmin v. Cuozzo, the Patent Trial and Appeal Board of the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office issued its first final decision after trial in an inter partes review (IPR). The decision provides important lessons for patent enforcement cases.
 
The Holding
 
On Nov. 13, 2013, in its first final decision under the IPR process provided for by the America Invents Act, the PTAB held, in Garmin v. Cuozzo, that three of the 20 claims of U.S. Patent No. 6,778,074 ('074 patent) are unpatentable because they are obvious over prior art. Seventeen claims remain to be enforced in four court actions that Cuozzo brought against Garmin and other companies.
 
The Facts
 
The '074 patent is directed to a speed limit indicator and a method for displaying a vehicle's speed and the relevant speed limit. The specification states that the speed limit indicator reduces the chance of an accident by eliminating the need for the driver to take his or her eyes off the road to look for speed limit signs and resolves any confusion that might exist as to what is the current legal speed limit.
 

Click here to read the full article on Law360.

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December 5, 2013

By: Susan G. L. Glovsky and Timothy J. Meagher

Law360

View Link

The following is an excerpt from this article on Law360.

In Garmin v. Cuozzo, the Patent Trial and Appeal Board of the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office issued its first final decision after trial in an inter partes review (IPR). The decision provides important lessons for patent enforcement cases.
 
The Holding
 
On Nov. 13, 2013, in its first final decision under the IPR process provided for by the America Invents Act, the PTAB held, in Garmin v. Cuozzo, that three of the 20 claims of U.S. Patent No. 6,778,074 ('074 patent) are unpatentable because they are obvious over prior art. Seventeen claims remain to be enforced in four court actions that Cuozzo brought against Garmin and other companies.
 
The Facts
 
The '074 patent is directed to a speed limit indicator and a method for displaying a vehicle's speed and the relevant speed limit. The specification states that the speed limit indicator reduces the chance of an accident by eliminating the need for the driver to take his or her eyes off the road to look for speed limit signs and resolves any confusion that might exist as to what is the current legal speed limit.
 

Click here to read the full article on Law360.

PDF FileView as PDF

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