WEBCAST RECORDING: Alice Corp. v. CLS Bank International: A New Framework or Just More Mayo?

July 17, 2014

How to Recognize and Meet the Challenges of Software and Other Computer-Implemented Inventions

 

InLegally Live Alice Corporation Pty. Ltd. v. CLS Bank International, the U.S. Supreme Court unanimously found that the patent claims, which involved reducing risk through the use of an intermediary, were directed to an abstract idea and were insufficient to transform the abstract idea into patent-eligible subject matter.  In making this finding, the Court relied heavily on its prior teachings on patent eligibility from Mayo Collaborative Services v. Prometheus Laboratories, Inc. and Bilski v. Kappos.  The Court also underscored that merely adding general computer implementation language to a claim that is otherwise directed to an abstract idea will not impart patent eligibility, but may have further contributed to the confusion surrounding patent eligibility by again failing to state what constitutes ‘enough’ to transform an abstract idea into a patent-eligible invention.

This webcast focused on:

  • Understanding the Court’s framework for identifying patent claims directed to abstract ideas.
  • Drafting claims to eligible subject matter.
  • Litigating patent claims directed to abstract ideas and patent-eligible inventions after Alice Corp.

Below is a recording of this webcast from July 17, 2014.

Loading the player...
About

July 17, 2014

How to Recognize and Meet the Challenges of Software and Other Computer-Implemented Inventions

 

InLegally Live Alice Corporation Pty. Ltd. v. CLS Bank International, the U.S. Supreme Court unanimously found that the patent claims, which involved reducing risk through the use of an intermediary, were directed to an abstract idea and were insufficient to transform the abstract idea into patent-eligible subject matter.  In making this finding, the Court relied heavily on its prior teachings on patent eligibility from Mayo Collaborative Services v. Prometheus Laboratories, Inc. and Bilski v. Kappos.  The Court also underscored that merely adding general computer implementation language to a claim that is otherwise directed to an abstract idea will not impart patent eligibility, but may have further contributed to the confusion surrounding patent eligibility by again failing to state what constitutes ‘enough’ to transform an abstract idea into a patent-eligible invention.

This webcast focused on:

  • Understanding the Court’s framework for identifying patent claims directed to abstract ideas.
  • Drafting claims to eligible subject matter.
  • Litigating patent claims directed to abstract ideas and patent-eligible inventions after Alice Corp.

Below is a recording of this webcast from July 17, 2014.

Loading the player...

Back to the Top