Patent Portfolio Management in Uncertain Economic Times

June 29, 2020

By: F. James Coe

Article Published in Bloomberg Law



 

 


 

Patent portfolios are excellent long-term investments, and it’s critical to review your portfolio during these uncertain economic times. James Coe, counsel at Hamilton Brook Smith Reynolds, says it’s important to resist the urge to shift toward short-term savings and outlines several ways to reduce patent-related costs, including reevaluating your patent filing strategy and shedding obsolete assets.

With the global disruption the Covid-19 pandemic has caused to the markets and supply chains, your company may be addressing the economic uncertainty by either freezing or cutting budgets—including its patent spend.

However, a patent portfolio is a long-term investment, and any cost-cutting measures should be viewed with that in mind.

Click here to continue reading the full article to find out a few things you may want to consider to keep your patent-related expenses down.
 



About the Author

Prior to joining Hamilton Brook Smith Reynolds, James served as General Counsel of a venture-capital-backed startup in the field of additive manufacturing, and before that, as Chief Patent Counsel for the Americas region of a multinational corporation. In those roles, James managed the development of patent portfolios in a variety of technologies, working closely with both engineering and business managers. At the firm, James advises clients on establishing corporate processes that link intellectual property portfolio development to business objectives. His advisory role includes assisting clients in conducting invention mining sessions, providing patent portfolio analysis of competitors, establishing corporate intellectual property policies, managing budgets for cost effective intellectual property portfolio development, and performing intellectual property audits.

Click here to read James' recent IP News Alert titled, "United States Patent Office Finds Artificial Intelligence System Cannot Be An Inventor."

Overview

June 29, 2020

By: F. James Coe

Article Published in Bloomberg Law



 

 


 

Patent portfolios are excellent long-term investments, and it’s critical to review your portfolio during these uncertain economic times. James Coe, counsel at Hamilton Brook Smith Reynolds, says it’s important to resist the urge to shift toward short-term savings and outlines several ways to reduce patent-related costs, including reevaluating your patent filing strategy and shedding obsolete assets.

With the global disruption the Covid-19 pandemic has caused to the markets and supply chains, your company may be addressing the economic uncertainty by either freezing or cutting budgets—including its patent spend.

However, a patent portfolio is a long-term investment, and any cost-cutting measures should be viewed with that in mind.

Click here to continue reading the full article to find out a few things you may want to consider to keep your patent-related expenses down.
 



About the Author

Prior to joining Hamilton Brook Smith Reynolds, James served as General Counsel of a venture-capital-backed startup in the field of additive manufacturing, and before that, as Chief Patent Counsel for the Americas region of a multinational corporation. In those roles, James managed the development of patent portfolios in a variety of technologies, working closely with both engineering and business managers. At the firm, James advises clients on establishing corporate processes that link intellectual property portfolio development to business objectives. His advisory role includes assisting clients in conducting invention mining sessions, providing patent portfolio analysis of competitors, establishing corporate intellectual property policies, managing budgets for cost effective intellectual property portfolio development, and performing intellectual property audits.

Click here to read James' recent IP News Alert titled, "United States Patent Office Finds Artificial Intelligence System Cannot Be An Inventor."

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